Dad’s First Ice Fish!

20171229_150158

For my last day in New England before the journey back the South, I decided to go back to the ole’ honey hole, Dennis Pond, to ensure at least a few fish. My father had been coming with me for the past couple trips, and had yet to pull anything.

We drilled 7 holes, two rows of three and one in the middle. I decided to try my luck at the tip-up dad had given me for Christmakkah and fitted it with about 12ft of monofil 4lb test line, a small spoon/treble and a dead minnow. The plan was to set the tip-up in the middle hole, and jig with our small 1.5″ spoons and some mousses in the surrounding holes to attract fish.

Within ten minutes we had a flag up!

20171229_135728

It was a little chain pickerel.

20171229_135735

Back he went. Felt pretty successful to have my first tip-up catch! So Dad was enthused by this and insisted I set him up his own, which I went ahead and did. In the meantime, I picked a hole adjacent to the one I had the tip up in and jigged the bottom with a couple of mousses. Decided to pound the bottom and see what would come along.

20171229_142731

Plucked up this fat little perch! Did not even realize they had perch in this lake– it’s truly a great multispecies destination. So far we have turned up pickerel, perch, bass, and crappie all from the ice.

In the mean time, Dad was still struggling to turn up a catch. I drilled a new hole adjacent to the one I jigged up the perch in  and we moved his tip-up there.

In the midst of all this, we were freezing. The weather took a plummet this week in CT, and was about 5-degrees, -12 with wind chill. Long underwear, based layers, insulation layers, down jackets, multiple socks — still the cold was piercing through us. We made a smart decision today that I suggest anyone hitting the ice do: we put warmers on the tops and bottoms of our feet between the two sock layers. It just keeps your toes from getting to the falling off point.

Dad was jigging a few holes away when suddenly his tip-up’s flag sprung up and was spinning wildly!

“Fish on!” I shouted toward Dad who gave me a blank stare in return, “Fish on! Fish on!”

He finally seemed to come to his senses when I up and ran to the flag, pointing at it, hoping the fish didn’t tear through the 4lb test line barely holding it on.

20171229_150158

Dad makes his way to the hole and starts reeling on the spool.

“Hand over hand!” I was doing some serious back seat fishing by this point. But, it’s really easy for the fish to get away without proper finesse when you’re using such thin line. He finally drops the tip up, and begins to bring it in, hand over hand, letting the line slide with tension through his fingers when the fish swam.

The fish was tiring out, and it felt pretty good sized. Finally it surfaced!

20171229_150336

Out came a beautiful large mouth bass. Didn’t have the scale on us, but I would eye it at a little over 1lb.

IMG_20171229_164905_557

Released for another day, but not before a bunch of pictures, hugs and high fives. Dad finally caught a fish through the ice!

With that, concluded our last ice fishing trip, and my vacation in the North. Back to the South tomorrow, got a long drive ahead. Gonna miss hitting the ice!

Texas Pond

We hadn’t taken out the raft in a while so headed to Texas Pond right outside Fort Bragg. The water was surprisingly low, seeming to average no more than two feet in any location.

 As usual, little B was ready to go in her outward Hound life vest and boat shoes. Dan had been researching and experimenting with different types of hard plastic minnows and spinners/buzz baits. I really never got into using these so it was a bit of a learning curve for me.

One lure he used was a white Mistsuo popper. The method was to toss out, then twitch the bait causing it to splash back and fort, and pause while reeling to retrieve the slack line.

Dan seemed to have pretty good success with this. He used the same method with a black lucky craft topwater bass lure. In the mean time I am not catching anything and getting fairly frustrated. Dans been watching a lot of videos and doing a lot of research, so really its no surprise he has gotten a lot better. Nevertheless, I am butthurt at this point.

Poor poo dog still hasn’t gotten used to being in a boat. She continues to cling to my leg and get in the way of rowing. Not sure how to get her used to it outside of continuing to bring her though. It’s sort of cute how she will conquer her fears to be with us though!

Dan also hooked a decent sized chain Pickerel! This one was snagged utilizing a jerk bait. The method here involves holding the rod at a 90 degree angle from where you tossed the lure, then jerking the lure toward you and reeling in between as you go. There are a many ways to retrieve: aggressive, twitches, long pauses, continuous… you simply have to try different speeds and levels of aggression until one attracts the bite.
Of course when I tried this, I seemed to attract nothing. Finally, I got a big hit on the jerk bait and I was hoping to see a Pickerel or a bass!

Thanks to Dans extensive research, we are breaking into the world of hard plastic lures and there’s so much to try. Though often harder than live bait, it’s a fun challenge to work and finesse the lures to get that bite. We will continue to update with different lures and methods.

How to Clean a Fish in Three Steps

 

A few months ago when I went camping and fishing at Dick’s Creek with my friends, a friend of mine showed me this extremely simple way to clean a fish (in this case, a trout) without fileting. It’s great for a serving the fish in a way you can eat the meat off the bone. You can’t quite make a sandwich with this method, but it’s a very simple, very tidy way to do it. Here are the step by step instructions with pictures from my trip to Nimblewill Creek. It takes no more than 2-5 minutes per trout depending how good you are with your knife.

Tools You Need: A sharp knife, a source of water for rinsing, something to contain the cleaned fish, and a place to dispose or discard the parts you will not use.

Personally, I used my Khukuri knife and Dan his Rogue Survival Knife.

 

We just did this all by the creek for washing and discarding, and had a pan for the usable parts.

Step 1: Remove the Head

20170617_183934

Find a hard surface like a rock, and simply cut the fish through right behind the gills. Be careful of your fingers because a fish like a trout can be very slippery. You can keep the head if you wish to use it, or cook it that way, but I just discard it.

Update: It has been pointed out to me by RawSkillsBushcraft that a rock is not the ideal surface due to the potential for damaging your knife. Instead, find something like a piece of wood that will not dull your blade. Additionally, as I have done previously at Bongam Lake, you can absolutely keep the head to eat the meat from the cheeks or use in a soup. In a survival situation where every bit of protein matters, you need to do this.

 

Step 2: Cut Lengthwise from the Anus and Peel Open

20170617_184107

Make the cut beginning at the anus, and ending at the severed head deep enough that you can get your thumbs inside to peel the fish open cleanly, revealing two filets on the side, and a bunch of organs. Careful not to pop the gall or anything.

Update: For clarification, as a reader suggested, there are specific ways that eases this process. As tomcatHoly  explains, position the knife nearly parallel to the fish, angling it so the top quarter inch or so of the blade is pressing against the skin. Push forward to split open the thin membrane on the belly, which will split open as you go.

Now, alternatively, you can insert the knife point perpendicular to the fish at the anus, blade toward the “head” just enough so the knife penetrates through the  membrane: a quarter inch or so depending on the size of the fish. You need a sharp knife to do this method. At this point, just angle the knife with blade bent slightly toward the fish, and carefully cut the membrane in the direction of the “head.”

Step 3: Remove the Organs, Push out the Blood

20170617_184117

Pull the organs out carefully and discard. Last, press your thumb hard at the base of the spine and push out all the blood built up. Then just dunk the fish in water to wash it off, remove any extra blood or goo, and you’re done!

20170617_230634

Voila! Trout cleaned and ready to cook!

Thank you to the readers who provided suggestions to make this guide more detailed and easier to follow. I am open to any and all suggestions, critiques or anything else you wish to say either by comment or using the contact button at the top.

 

 

Kiest Lake

20170430_185254

Wanting to branch out our North Carolina expeditions, we set off for Kiest Lake, near Fort Bragg Military Reservation.  It was a hot ass day, upwards of 90 degrees F with at least 80% humidity. We settled on the South side of the lake, where there was a  fairly large clearing we could pull the truck into. Little Brook was suffering though. No shade. SO hot. We left the car door open for her just in case, but she improvised on the shade;

20170520_154604

Yup, she hung out under the truck! We stuck her water bowl down there too. And don’t worry– every hour or so, we turned on the truck, pumped the air and cooled off our little daughter. Gotta be careful this time of year in the Southern United States. There are countless cases of pet dogs dying of heat exhaustion,  but at the same time we love our dog and want her to have fun and be included. We take every measure possible to ensure she is comfortable and well taken care of.

Anyways, Dan set up his massive carp rig because supposedly there’s huge common carp in this lake. I don’t have any pictures of the set up but I will take some next time it is used. It’s similar to a catfish set up, only the poles are lying parallel to the surface of the lake instead of perpendicular. There is also this motion detector device that beeps when the line is pulled. Unlike a catfish rod, you do not want “tight lines” on this rig. The drag is almost completely loose, allowing carps to suck the bait in and run with it before hooking themselves. We experienced a few beeps here and there but nothing seeemed to stick. Turns out, there were an astronomical amount of turtles in there!

IMG_20170520_152412_533

Here’s a little one I managed to pull up with our landing net. They’re some sort of box turtle, and love to nibble fishing bait. Since they have those little beaks, they don’t get hooked and just steal the bait! While Dan worked on his carp set-up and tossed in a few senkos for bass, I set up some catfish lines and threw in a few casts of my own. The bottom of this lake is incredibly weedy, so the “secret technique” was an absolute no-go. Instead, I used a foam stick bobber and set it up about 2 feet above my bait (nightcrawlers).

20161010_140521

I managed to catch a gill on this bobber set up that I turned into cutbait. In the mean time, neither the carp rods nor the catfish rods were getting much action. It was such a hot day, that I assume the fish were very slow moving and avoiding the heated up shallower ends. Likely in the middle of the lake, just treading water down below. After I while, I did get a pull on one of the cat rods, though! Reeled t his one in, pretty excited. With it came an enormous hunk of weeds, but hidden beneath the weeds there was indeed a fish!

20170520_131809

This skinny guy was trying to eat himself some gill. Definitely did not expect to pull up an LMB on the cat rods, but lo and behold there she was! I let her go, recasted the rod and then continued to throw out the bobber set up. Dan was preoccupied with some mysterious beeping on his carp rods,  but nothing seemed to set. Somehow, I managed to pull up another small bass on the bobber.

20170520_174025

No action following this for quite a while. We decided to call it, and head back. After all, poor little B was probably burning up in her little yellow fur coat. Not a terrible fishing day, but the heat was tough to bare– for us, and apparently for the fish. Supposedly this lake is filled with bass, so we certainly just scraped the surface on this one. We will return to see what we can garner next time.

Dick’s Creek

20170325_081034

In the past few days, Dan moved up to North Carolina with Brook, and I am still in Georgia. My friends and I decided to plan a camping/fishing trip for the gang and our resident North Georgia native chose the beautiful, mountainous region of Dahlonega. The campsite we picked was located in an area called Dick’s Creek. This was a stunning creek bed, tumbling over a few waterfalls and stretching as far as the eye could see. We drove about 3 hours to get there, and nestled into a site in the corner. The trout was stocked seasonally with both browns and rainbows. Since we had never trout fished before, my friend advised us on a few different types of bait to try: canned corn, and salmon eggs. Similar to when we’re freelining for bass, you want to use as small a hook as possible with little to no weight.

20170325_081029

Of course little Brooky had to come with us. That’s basically my negotiation piece for anyone that asks me to hang out… its either both of us or none of us! Anyways, we head down to the river, and Dan and I decide to throw a couple lines in right at the base of that magnificent waterfall picture above. Brook didn’t like when we got more than an arms reach away from here, so she was yipping a little bit… It didn’t take us too long to start bringing ’em in! I started up on a piece of corn and reeled in a really nice Brown trout.

20170325_082550

Dan caught a few shortly after. We were able to walk up and down the creek to try different spots, and kept all our catches on a trout line in the water so they would stay fresh for the open fire cookout to take place later.  Honestly, we would have stayed in the same spot, but as usual once folks caught onto that we were bringing em in, they all congregated to adjacent locations and casted directly in front of us. Being Georgia, these people also had on overalls without any shirts underneath, etc…

20170325_145303

Here’s a picture of one of the rainbows I caught as well. We ended up with a total of 5 trout. We and my friend (after he fell into the creek, gave up, and went out again) brought in 6. He taught as a very simple way to clean the trout. Just make a clean cut behind the gills, then slit the bottom from cut to anus. After that, simply pull out the guts, toss them away and squeeze out the blood pooling near the spine. The camping trip was a huge success, lots of games, drinking, cooking, and fun. We had burgers and buttered trout cooked open the fire. Truly a good ole fashioned American time. Brook was having a great time, too, running 100mph around our camp site.

IMG_20170326_162733_514

Really fun first time trout fishing. Sadly since then, a wildfire burned most of Dick’s Creek area down to the ground. I am happy we were able to experience it before that disaster.

Engineer Landing

20161029_123130

I had been to the Chattahoochee River before unsuccessfully a few times, but this time was after Dan and I had discovered our nearly fool proof slow pitch jigging technique. The area we decided to head to is called Engineer landing. There is basically a dirt path wide enough for a car that leads to a small landing on the river. The bank is pretty muddy, but wide enough you can fish in a couple different spots. The view here was stunning, as is most fishing locations. Sadly, though a lot of trash and crap was left behind and strewn about. Kind of a bummer especially when you want to let your dog run around, but there’s broken glass everywhere.  Last time I went, I wore sandals and seriously regretted it… after also being covered in mud and bitten all over by sand flies.

20161029_123128

The Chattahoochee is split pretty much in half between Georgia and Alabama. We were on the Georgia side. We set up a few catfish rigs, consisting of long spin reels leaning on rod stands. For bait, we had dough and liver. The river is supposed to be a prime spot for getting large blue and channel cats so we were excited to see what we could pull up. Surprisingly, the area was fairly packed with other anglers as well. We could even seen some Alabama anglers across the way.

20170311_133133

That was once my cap, but it is now Dan’s official fishing hat. Not the best rodholders, just some cheap ones from the post exchange. While waiting, we picked up a couple of regular spin reels and casted out to see what we could grab. The “Hooch” (as some of the locals call it… supposedly) is also home to a couple types of bass including LMB, Smallies and stripers. In fact, it’s even been known to have a pike or two. We tested this out and ended up bringing in a fish on a rooster tail!

20170311_122435

Yup, just a dumb sun fish. Albeit, this one was a Green sunfish and was particularly radiant. So from research we learned that catfish love cutbait. We cut this little fella up on the back of my hatch only to reveal he had FOUR WORMS in his belly, the glutton! What a greedy little guy! Dan also had no problem leaving fish guts all over the back of my car…

Well, we recasted out our cat lines with the new bait, and saved the rest of it for a later date. At some point, I went into the backseat of my car to rummage for something and what do I find!? The freaking TAIL of the sunfish. So I’m like, “Dan why did you put the tail in my car!?” since it’s going to stink it up, I’m kinda irked… But he denied all culpability. Meaning there was ONLY ONE PRIME SUSPECT…

20170311_133049Yup, little Brookster for some reason grabbed the tail off the ground and put it in my car, since I left the door open. What a dork!

Unfortunately, outside of the one sunfish, we turned up empty this time around. But we will certainly be back to conquer “The Hooch”! Gotta do more homework and really look into what the big cats want to eat.

20170311_133153

Man, I love this dog…

Twilight Pond (Again)

20170212_160948

Now this was a great day of fishing. A bit after our initial success at Twilight Pond, Dan, Brook and I decided to make our return. We used nightcrawlers again and a similar method to the first time– a sort of modified slow-pitch jigging. Almost off the bat we were getting bites left and right.  I was fighting a bass for a while, when I finally hooked him. I reeled him in in a frenzy and DISASTER STRUCK. The fish got away, and it felt like a big one, too. When I brought my line out, the hook was nowhere to be found. Was it big enough to have broken the line? Well, it happened AGAIN! And as it turned out, my knot was coming undone. Let me admit that I’d been really lazy with my spin reel knot tying because I never expected to get anything huge. Like I said before, my luck had been pretty poor in Georgia. So instead of a figure eight with a bight, I’d been doing like 5 square knots in a row. I know, I know… really idiotic. So I go over to fix this problem, and in the mean time Dan steps in my spot.

20170225_121059

And comes out with a HOG! We didn’t have a scale, but it was around 18 inches long, so assuming 3-4lb. A great catch! I have to say though I was a little butthurt that I moved away for a second and he snagged my nemesis. I definitely get a little competitive with catching! Anyways, we were fishing for food today, so we knocked this bad boy out and put him in the cooler. I retook my spot and got another bite.

20170225_124800

To my surprise I pulled out this flathead! Had no idea there were even catfish in this pond since it had recently been drained. Threw him in with the LMB to add some catfish nuggets to our future meal. Our luck kept going at this point.

20170225_13505020170225_13502320170225_125558

Pulled out 3 more pigs! Really great day of fishing since we were only there a few hours! Here’s one in comparison to Brooky:

20170225_135119

She always likes to give the fish a little sniff and a lick. Anyways, we threw a couple back and kept 3 largemouths and the flathead to go. Cleaned all four fish, and got some nice filets out of them. We seasoned with salt and pepper, washed with egg, and bathed in a combination of breadcrumbs, salt/pepper/garlic and other fry seasonings. We pan fried the bass in filets and the flathead in nuggets.

IMG_20170226_104715_019

Came out amazing. There’s always something extremely satisfying about catching, cleaning and cooking your own protein. Overall, a really successful day for fishing.

Twilight Pond

20170212_160951Since moving to Georgia from Korea (after a stop in CT), I had horrible fishing luck. I’d tried numerous spots around the area with absolutely no luck. I bought more and more American style lures and tackle and NOTHING seemed to grab me anything other than sunfish! My first experience at Twilight came after my sister visited me down here.

Pulledthis doofy little blue gill. Sure was a cute one! At least this pond was absolutely beautiful and with the Southern sun shining down, I couldn’t keep myself from coming here again.

Fast forward a few months (YES, MONTHS! MONTHS WITHOUT A CATCH I WENT! SOME ANGLER I AM!) and Dan finally arrived from Korea! When Brook saw him, it was an incredible reunion. I talk about Brook briefly in our about section, but I promise a future post on her entire situation. Let’s just say she was really happy to see him again. And the feeling was mutual!

20170220_094701Of course the first thing Dan and I did was have to go fishing together again. And this time with our little companion. I brought him to Twilight and mourned my inability to catch anything since before he came. He then showed me a secret technique he learned while in California from an old man who took him under his wing (yes, again). I’ll post on that later, as well. But anyways, I changed baits from soft plastics to live nightcrawlers, changed up my presentation technique.

20170220_145851

And finally after long last, I caught my first Georgian bass! A little guy, but still. That definitely started a roll and I was able to bring in one more juvenile LMB

20170220_153717

This was the first time Brook has seen a fish! She gave it a couple sniffs, and a lick. I was ecstatic. This beautiful but desolate fishing spot all of the sudden became teeming with life. Surprisingly, Dan’s luck rubbed off on me and he didn’t end up pulling anything but shellcrackers.

I couldn’t be more excited to get back here with Dan! Unfortunately, I have work a lot while Dan’s here so we’ll hit it again next time when we can. But I am so grateful to have the opportunity to fish with him again. The duo is back! This time with our little sidekick, reunited with us!

20170220_213951

 

Dennis Pond

20161225_133838

Again, this is a late post and also took place around Christmas 2016. However, I’m excited to share our more successful ice fishing trip to Dennis Pond in Stafford, CT! But first, here’s how Christmas went for us:

PhotoGrid_1482679614518

Good times were had by all. Anyways…

My dad had long seen the pictures Dan and I post of decent sized panfish so decided to come along and join us this time. The pond was fairly small sized, though there was another group with tip-ups set up on the other side. The ice was a little thin on the outskirts but once again, drilling ever 10 feet gave us the 3.5 inches of confidence we needed to continue.

20161225_123716

We used the same equipment as at Hurds, but this time the addition of some small shiners. We drilled a good amount of holes from the shallower side, toward the middle and in a lateral row from there. Then we began jigging the holes. Once again about 10-15 minutes per hole before moving onto the next. My dad was nervous to walk on the ice, and also has a habit of contradicting every technique I have learned about fishing… which in this case, instead of a spike or two, or a single shiner on a tiny rooster tail or a treble hook, he decided to stick on a trout worm, a piece of corn, a grub etc all on each prong of the treble… Giving the fish the full platter! I can’t say whether or not this is a valid way to go about it (not experienced enough), but I’ll reveal if it worked out a little later!

20161225_125722

First catch of the day was this little bass by me! Ice fishing has a lot of finesse in the reel in and finish because the 3lb test line is so fragile. It’s a lot of fun to fight a fish with such light equipment.

20161225_130016

Dan wanted to pose with my catch, hehe. No luck for the men, yet. We jigged, we chatter, we drank some brews– really enjoyable time. After a while, Dan ended up getting a big tug! And out popped this beautiful creature:

IMG_20161225_140005

A stunning black crappie. The vibrant color pattern was amazing against the white-out background of the ice. Needless to say, Dan was really pleased with himself! Now, it was time for Dad to catch up and get one for his own…. right?  In the mean time, I’m drilling more holes, sweat dripping down my back, trying to one up Dan’s awesome catch. I kept getting nibbles and nibbles and nothing was grabbing…So then I was desperate… jigging, jigging, that same spot, still getting nibbles… And Dan decides to come see what’s up:

20161225_141133

I was still bursting with adrenaline and with Dan stomping over I tried to shout to him “Wait, Stop! Don’t come over! You’ll scare away the fish!” but he couldn’t hear me, kept saying “WHAT!” and he kept on coming… closer… closer….and next thing I know, Dan is literally head over heels in the air. BOOM! He goes crashing into the ice, which by the grace of God himself, did not break through. 3.5 inches, 225lb x gravity… That’s actually some strong ice!

20161225_141131

Though he definitely succeeded in scaring away all the fish, I couldn’t help but laugh my ass off. He was alright! No injuries, somehow didn’t end up beneath the ice. I rated the fall a 7/10…. extremely funny, but too loud. That ended this day, though Dad turned up short.

Dad and I decided to return the next day to test our lucky again.  Just going about the usual business and SUDDENLY I felt the biggest pull of my life… I pulled and pulled and pulled and a HOG of a bass emerged head first from my hole. Being a noob, and overexcited I yanked the line… And guess what? 3lb test line is not going to survive against a flopping over 3lb fish out of water. The line snapped, and that was the story of the one that got away. All wasn’t lost though cause I ended up with something!

20170101_133331

This awesome chain pickerel I pulled up on a shiner ended up being the last catch of the day. These guys have actual pointy little teeth, and they definitely put up a fight! Sadly, Dad’s bait medley was not successful overall, but Dan and I managed to turn up some unique and beautiful fish. Ice fishing was an incredible skill to learn and I really can’t wait until the next winter season. At this point Christmas leave was coming to a close, Dan returned to Korea and I started my new life in Georgia.

Hurds Lake

Forgive me for the lateness of this post– it actually took place over Christmas 2016, but I figure its still worth sharing the adventure. So over Christmas, Dan and I decided to go to CT to visit my parents and family dogs: Jade (Husky), Charles (Shih Tzu), and Rocky (Chihuahua).

Had to include a picture of these guys; they’re too cute. Anyways, be as it was winter time, for the first time Dan and I decided to take up Ice fishing. We scoured the internet for information on what we would need and set off to Cabelas. Hardest part about trying anything new, by far, is looking like an idiot the first time. While we were there, we were lucky enough to meet a gentleman named Rotha (just a friendly customer!) who decided to take us under his wing and give us the low down on what we truly needed, and good spots to go. So we grabbed the equipment based on his suggestions and headed to a place called Hurds Lake in the small town of Somers.

20161223_120340

Oh man, to be back in the midst of good ole fashion rustic American beauty. The lake was mid-sized, and walkable from shore to shore. Surrounded by nothing but forest, it was really breathtaking. Note, its recommended at least 3.5 inches of ice to be considered safe for people to walk on. So as we set out, we drilled a hole with the auger every 10 feet or so to be safe. People actually die by falling through the ice, so it’s no joke. First thing we noticed is a strange loud noises as well echoing throughout the scene. As it turns out, the sound of ice cracking/settling is really unique! Here is a random youtube video where you can hear it. I had no idea what it was until I looked it up!

20161223_095533

We set off digging our holes with our 6-in diameter handheld auger. It basically screwed a hole into the ice. It was a lot easier for Dan to use the auger, being 6’2, because the trick is to spin the handle while applying downward pressure. I, at 5’0, was sweating my ass off. We also wore chains/crampons with our shoes to prevent falling. Winter clothing (parka, insulation layer, base layer, gloves, hoods/hats) were also necessary because it was COLD!

20161223_095940

From there, we used our metal scoop to scoop out all the ice shavings from the hole to prevent it from refreezing or trapping our catches. We had our buckets both to sit on, and to carry our equipment in (including bait). We used a technique called “jigging,” which, similar to the regular fishing technique, you drop a line in with a jig attached (in this case, a really, really small one) to the ground, reel in to a few inches above the bottom, and simple bounce the bait up and down in your hand. The grip is a little different for ice fishing because you want your index finger actually touching the rod portion above the reel for better sensitivity.

20161223_095221

Let me quickly explain the rod. So for ice fishing, generally the lighter weight the better. The rods used for jigging are really small, so we went with an ultralite version. I can’t remember the exact brand, but I will post it up here when I get the chance. Additionally, from Rotha’s advice, we used a 3lb test line. Seems REALLY light, but with ice fishing, the reel in is a lot of finesse and the 3lb line will absolutely alert you when there’s a bite. We used a neon orange color that we could see inside the holes.

 

20161223_121457

There’s a closer snapshot of what it looked like. Jigging itself can be fairly tedious. We spent approximately 10-15 minutes jigging a hole before moving onto the next one, and traveled from close to shore all the way to the center and beyond. We didn’t exactly have the most luck, but as beginners, its expected. For bait, we used spikes and mousees.

20161223_112946

After long last, we pulled out this little perch. Pretty little thing! We called it a day after letting him go, and headed back home. It was a really cool experience learning how to ice fish, and even better that no matter how small, we did in fact snag a fish!

20161223_121530

We felt pretty good about ourselves at the end of the day (though we were total icicles), and couldn’t wait to get out and try it again. Learning a new skill is always so much fun. I would encourage any angler to go out and try ice fishing, and if you’re in the eastern US next winter, let us know, and we’d gladly go out with you and let you use some of our stuff!