McKellar’s Pond #2

Given our success at McKellar’s the first time, we decided to go at it again and see what we’d come up with. This time, we entered from McKellar’s road to a dirt path that had little wooden posts next to it– more of a “main” entrance. We took a left, following the small creek that borders the pond, and settled  in the north, directly across from the Peninsula. We took with us two Shakespeare 7′ Ugly Sticks, and one 7′ PLUSINNO Spinning telescopic rod, in addition to a 5′ telescopic for casting. We used both size 5/0 treble hooks, and size 5/0 circle hooks. Bait was chicken blood doughs, little stinker dip bait, and cut bait we saved from last time (blue gill). The setup was the same as last time– casted out as far as possible, and posted into the ground with rod holders. At the same time, we threw a couple free lines in for baitfish. As soon as evening hit (6pm and forward) the hits started coming!

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We were catching a lot of channels, but at the same time missing a lot. This sort of brought up a hook size debate. Circle hooks in particular work by turning and grabbing the side of the fish’s lips, which is why you generally do not have to “set” the hook like you do bait hooks and others. But the issue is if the bait covers the space between the tip and the rest of the hook too much, the hook has a tendency to bounce out. We experimented a lot with bait sizing, but we only had the 5/0 hooks so stuck with them.

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Seriously, the cats kept coming in! It was a great fishing day. Brook had fun, too. She is very well trained now so she is allowed off the leash and she is too scared to run away from us in the dark anyways. I do worry  about other angler’s trash though. God forbid she get into a discarded hook. Let that be a lesson– PLEASE clean up after yourself when fishing. If not for the good of the environment, for those of us who bring out furry friends out there.

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I just had to add this picture in because it was taken right after Dan slapped himself in the face with a big chunk of stinky cut bait, which I found HILARIOUS. As usual, he was mad at me for laughing at his expense, hence the facial expression…

The next cat we pulled up was a WEIRD surprise. Since we are relatively new in our channel cat angling escapades, we do a lot of studying of the fish’s anatomy, skin, fins, etc in order to better identify. We snag up a seemingly normal fish and Dan goes “This one’s all white!”

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Now check that out!  A ghost catfish in the night! Here’s it next to a regular channel for comparison:

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If you watch The Last Airbender, my immediate reaction was we have captures the OCEAN and the MOON spirits! Twi and La! Really cool catch anyways! It turns out to be an Albino Channel catfish, which is a VERY rare sighting in the wild. Similar albinos are bred in captivity for small fish tanks (much much smaller than this channel). It was a really cool surprise, and likely something we may never see again! Of course we released the beautiful moon spirit, lest the entire world fall out of balance.

GREAT day of catfishing on McKellar’s pond. This pond is quiet, pleasant and chock full of channels. We will be back!

 

 

McKellar’s Pond

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In eastern/central North Carolina there are a few common types of American catfish: Channels, Blues, bullheads and flatheads. Since we often had success catching Amur catfish we decided to go after their supposedly delicious American cousins. McKellar’s pond is located in Fayetteville, NC tucked into a few backroads. The pond overall isn’t very well kept. It was littered with trash and remains of slobby fishing parties. Sad– they do not have any staff or conservationists to clean up; It’s the fisherman’s responsibility and it looks like people just don’t care around here.

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Anyways, we set up three catfish rods (two ugly sticks, and one telescopic) with different baits ranging from chicken liver flavored dough baits, to “Little Stinker” dip bait, and even some night crawlers. We casted out the rods as far as possible, then tightened the line up and placed the rods into individual rod holders. Finished it off with a little clip on bell that way when a fish bites, we are alerted. We used treble hooks for the dip/dough and circle hooks for other baits. In the mean time, we used our short rods to do a little spin fishing for bass or panfish. We went the first few hours without too much luck until I ended up catching this little guy:

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Channel catfish are known to like to eat bluegill, so we cut him up into small 1-1.5in sections, discarding the fins and spines and slipped it onto circle hooks. It’s important to note that the way a circle hook works is that it twists and punctures the side of the fish’s mouth. So when baiting a circle hook you want to ensure you keep the gap between the point and the hook fairly clear. Bigger bait isn’t always better on a circle hook, especially a smaller one like the 5/0 we were using.

 

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Once the bluegill was on the hook and the sun began to set, the bites started coming. It’s a whole lot of fun when the bells start ringing on all the rods!

We ended up with a good amount of channel cats after the sun went down. Catfishing is a lot like carp fishing in Korea, where it’s pretty stationary and passive, but man it’s fun to bring ’em in once the bell jingles. In the mean time, we just hung out, drank, and played with Brook the entire time. We kept 3 cats to take home with us, and released the rest.

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We cleaned up our catches the next day, using a fairly simple technique of a diagonal cut behind the gills, a cut down the spine to the tail, and just slice the meat off the skin. We got four good filets out of it, which we pan fried up with some seasoned breadcrumbs, seasoned with salt and pepper and created some delicious cat fish po’boys.

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Always a great experienced to catch, clean, and cook. We have finally figured out how to catfish in America!