Wyatt Lake

Following our couple of bass (but no carp!) out at Kiest, we decided to amble down to the adjacent Wyatt Lake. Wyatt is not labelled on most maps that we saw, but it is to the direct East of Kiest, which is labelled. It’s a relatively small pond with a lot of landing areas to fish from. The entire pond feeds into the Little River.

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This is more of  a catfish pond, but the word on the street is that because most don’t fish it for bass, there are some lunkers sneaking around, little detected. At this point night was falling though so we decided to just get our cat gear set up. In addition to the single spin reel pole I threw out, Dan went ahead and cast out a couple of our traditional Korean cane poles. Depth wise, I was able to cast way further with the spin reel. Dan was maybe a few meters in front of the landing.

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But he ended up being the one to catch! With the cane pole, it’s important to have a landing net. The hooks used are much, much smaller (so more easily escaped), and since you have no reel, you bring the fish to you by tiring it out,  and raising the tip of the rod, basically fighting the fish intil it’s close enough to snag with the landing net.  I have explained this in my Korean fishing posts, but the cane pole rig is attached to a thin vertical bobber, which sinks and moves when the fish is grabbing the bait (raw chicken in this case).  When the bobber sinks all the way in, you set the hook by giving it a quick and forceful yank up. It’s a lot of fun to watch, and a lot of fun to fight to get the fish on shore.  This was the next catch for Dan:

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Yup– another turtle! They’re rampant around here. This poor little guy was hooked by his arm. He was obviously stealing the raw chicken and ended up caught in the act. And by the looks of it, he’s a little alarmed by the whole ordeal. And one more to complete the night:

It was nice to go to another lake after Kiest, and to get Dan catching a few! Nothing quite like the frustration of your fishing partner catching when you can only seem to pull up weeds and lose your lures. It was also really cool to break out the cane poles again. Still my favorite way to fish!

McKellar’s Pond

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In eastern/central North Carolina there are a few common types of American catfish: Channels, Blues, bullheads and flatheads. Since we often had success catching Amur catfish we decided to go after their supposedly delicious American cousins. McKellar’s pond is located in Fayetteville, NC tucked into a few backroads. The pond overall isn’t very well kept. It was littered with trash and remains of slobby fishing parties. Sad– they do not have any staff or conservationists to clean up; It’s the fisherman’s responsibility and it looks like people just don’t care around here.

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Anyways, we set up three catfish rods (two ugly sticks, and one telescopic) with different baits ranging from chicken liver flavored dough baits, to “Little Stinker” dip bait, and even some night crawlers. We casted out the rods as far as possible, then tightened the line up and placed the rods into individual rod holders. Finished it off with a little clip on bell that way when a fish bites, we are alerted. We used treble hooks for the dip/dough and circle hooks for other baits. In the mean time, we used our short rods to do a little spin fishing for bass or panfish. We went the first few hours without too much luck until I ended up catching this little guy:

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Channel catfish are known to like to eat bluegill, so we cut him up into small 1-1.5in sections, discarding the fins and spines and slipped it onto circle hooks. It’s important to note that the way a circle hook works is that it twists and punctures the side of the fish’s mouth. So when baiting a circle hook you want to ensure you keep the gap between the point and the hook fairly clear. Bigger bait isn’t always better on a circle hook, especially a smaller one like the 5/0 we were using.

 

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Once the bluegill was on the hook and the sun began to set, the bites started coming. It’s a whole lot of fun when the bells start ringing on all the rods!

We ended up with a good amount of channel cats after the sun went down. Catfishing is a lot like carp fishing in Korea, where it’s pretty stationary and passive, but man it’s fun to bring ’em in once the bell jingles. In the mean time, we just hung out, drank, and played with Brook the entire time. We kept 3 cats to take home with us, and released the rest.

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We cleaned up our catches the next day, using a fairly simple technique of a diagonal cut behind the gills, a cut down the spine to the tail, and just slice the meat off the skin. We got four good filets out of it, which we pan fried up with some seasoned breadcrumbs, seasoned with salt and pepper and created some delicious cat fish po’boys.

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Always a great experienced to catch, clean, and cook. We have finally figured out how to catfish in America!

Engineer Landing

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I had been to the Chattahoochee River before unsuccessfully a few times, but this time was after Dan and I had discovered our nearly fool proof slow pitch jigging technique. The area we decided to head to is called Engineer landing. There is basically a dirt path wide enough for a car that leads to a small landing on the river. The bank is pretty muddy, but wide enough you can fish in a couple different spots. The view here was stunning, as is most fishing locations. Sadly, though a lot of trash and crap was left behind and strewn about. Kind of a bummer especially when you want to let your dog run around, but there’s broken glass everywhere.  Last time I went, I wore sandals and seriously regretted it… after also being covered in mud and bitten all over by sand flies.

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The Chattahoochee is split pretty much in half between Georgia and Alabama. We were on the Georgia side. We set up a few catfish rigs, consisting of long spin reels leaning on rod stands. For bait, we had dough and liver. The river is supposed to be a prime spot for getting large blue and channel cats so we were excited to see what we could pull up. Surprisingly, the area was fairly packed with other anglers as well. We could even seen some Alabama anglers across the way.

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That was once my cap, but it is now Dan’s official fishing hat. Not the best rodholders, just some cheap ones from the post exchange. While waiting, we picked up a couple of regular spin reels and casted out to see what we could grab. The “Hooch” (as some of the locals call it… supposedly) is also home to a couple types of bass including LMB, Smallies and stripers. In fact, it’s even been known to have a pike or two. We tested this out and ended up bringing in a fish on a rooster tail!

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Yup, just a dumb sun fish. Albeit, this one was a Green sunfish and was particularly radiant. So from research we learned that catfish love cutbait. We cut this little fella up on the back of my hatch only to reveal he had FOUR WORMS in his belly, the glutton! What a greedy little guy! Dan also had no problem leaving fish guts all over the back of my car…

Well, we recasted out our cat lines with the new bait, and saved the rest of it for a later date. At some point, I went into the backseat of my car to rummage for something and what do I find!? The freaking TAIL of the sunfish. So I’m like, “Dan why did you put the tail in my car!?” since it’s going to stink it up, I’m kinda irked… But he denied all culpability. Meaning there was ONLY ONE PRIME SUSPECT…

20170311_133049Yup, little Brookster for some reason grabbed the tail off the ground and put it in my car, since I left the door open. What a dork!

Unfortunately, outside of the one sunfish, we turned up empty this time around. But we will certainly be back to conquer “The Hooch”! Gotta do more homework and really look into what the big cats want to eat.

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Man, I love this dog…

Twilight Pond (Again)

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Now this was a great day of fishing. A bit after our initial success at Twilight Pond, Dan, Brook and I decided to make our return. We used nightcrawlers again and a similar method to the first time– a sort of modified slow-pitch jigging. Almost off the bat we were getting bites left and right.  I was fighting a bass for a while, when I finally hooked him. I reeled him in in a frenzy and DISASTER STRUCK. The fish got away, and it felt like a big one, too. When I brought my line out, the hook was nowhere to be found. Was it big enough to have broken the line? Well, it happened AGAIN! And as it turned out, my knot was coming undone. Let me admit that I’d been really lazy with my spin reel knot tying because I never expected to get anything huge. Like I said before, my luck had been pretty poor in Georgia. So instead of a figure eight with a bight, I’d been doing like 5 square knots in a row. I know, I know… really idiotic. So I go over to fix this problem, and in the mean time Dan steps in my spot.

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And comes out with a HOG! We didn’t have a scale, but it was around 18 inches long, so assuming 3-4lb. A great catch! I have to say though I was a little butthurt that I moved away for a second and he snagged my nemesis. I definitely get a little competitive with catching! Anyways, we were fishing for food today, so we knocked this bad boy out and put him in the cooler. I retook my spot and got another bite.

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To my surprise I pulled out this flathead! Had no idea there were even catfish in this pond since it had recently been drained. Threw him in with the LMB to add some catfish nuggets to our future meal. Our luck kept going at this point.

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Pulled out 3 more pigs! Really great day of fishing since we were only there a few hours! Here’s one in comparison to Brooky:

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She always likes to give the fish a little sniff and a lick. Anyways, we threw a couple back and kept 3 largemouths and the flathead to go. Cleaned all four fish, and got some nice filets out of them. We seasoned with salt and pepper, washed with egg, and bathed in a combination of breadcrumbs, salt/pepper/garlic and other fry seasonings. We pan fried the bass in filets and the flathead in nuggets.

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Came out amazing. There’s always something extremely satisfying about catching, cleaning and cooking your own protein. Overall, a really successful day for fishing.

Twilight Pond

20170212_160951Since moving to Georgia from Korea (after a stop in CT), I had horrible fishing luck. I’d tried numerous spots around the area with absolutely no luck. I bought more and more American style lures and tackle and NOTHING seemed to grab me anything other than sunfish! My first experience at Twilight came after my sister visited me down here.

Pulledthis doofy little blue gill. Sure was a cute one! At least this pond was absolutely beautiful and with the Southern sun shining down, I couldn’t keep myself from coming here again.

Fast forward a few months (YES, MONTHS! MONTHS WITHOUT A CATCH I WENT! SOME ANGLER I AM!) and Dan finally arrived from Korea! When Brook saw him, it was an incredible reunion. I talk about Brook briefly in our about section, but I promise a future post on her entire situation. Let’s just say she was really happy to see him again. And the feeling was mutual!

20170220_094701Of course the first thing Dan and I did was have to go fishing together again. And this time with our little companion. I brought him to Twilight and mourned my inability to catch anything since before he came. He then showed me a secret technique he learned while in California from an old man who took him under his wing (yes, again). I’ll post on that later, as well. But anyways, I changed baits from soft plastics to live nightcrawlers, changed up my presentation technique.

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And finally after long last, I caught my first Georgian bass! A little guy, but still. That definitely started a roll and I was able to bring in one more juvenile LMB

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This was the first time Brook has seen a fish! She gave it a couple sniffs, and a lick. I was ecstatic. This beautiful but desolate fishing spot all of the sudden became teeming with life. Surprisingly, Dan’s luck rubbed off on me and he didn’t end up pulling anything but shellcrackers.

I couldn’t be more excited to get back here with Dan! Unfortunately, I have work a lot while Dan’s here so we’ll hit it again next time when we can. But I am so grateful to have the opportunity to fish with him again. The duo is back! This time with our little sidekick, reunited with us!

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Some News

Welp, Dan and I have since officially left Korea and are back in the US. A bittersweet transition. However,  in the interest of keeping this blog up and running,  I am in the process of revamping it to represent our American fishing adventures as well, and adding a section for our exploration of amateur bushcraft! Dan and i are by no means experts on anything, but we’re just two average joes out to learn some great skills and share how you can,  too.

However, though we logged many fishing places in Korea we truly only skimmed the surface and I want to begin accepting guest submissions and testimonials from those of you who have fished korea that way I can keep this a growing english language  resource for expats interested in Korean fishing. I will be adding a submission option,  or feel free to email me,  and i will add your submission.  Additionally,  ill add capabilities to pin a location on the map.  Looking for your experiences at fishing holes in Korea,  private or public,  including your catches,  the atmosphere,  the type of fishing and what amenities were available.  Thank you all in advance.

Gimpo Fishing Pay Pond

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After arriving back from Jeju-do to Gimpo airport, we decided to see what sort of fishing we could find around Gimpo (a more rural area west of Seoul). We found a place called Gimpo Fishing Pay Pond. The area looked like a man-made reservoir for freshwater fishing, but there was also this huge structure for indoor saltwater fishing. It was closed at the time, so unfortunately we didn’t get to check out the salt area because it seemed really unique. Instead, we headed to the pond. It was 40k for the day here. They had plenty of bait (including live worms) and tackle to offer in the shop. You could even rent poles for the day. It had your usual Korean fishing park vibe– dock structures with chairs, small canopies and places to put your cane pole. As you can see, we arrived toward the evening.

20160925_154913 This one had areas that stretched out into the center which was pretty cool. However, it’s worth mentioning that NO reel fishing/casting was allowed at all. All cane pole. But, apparently this hole had TONS of different types of fish including common carp, prussian carp, amur catfish, bullheads, snakeheads, eel and even STURGEON! Obviously that being the biggest, Dan and I really wanted to catch a sturgeon. So we set up our station, cracked a soju (or two… or three) and started the wait. More soju. More waiting. In the mean time, no kidding, some ajjushi was catching like 40 common carp. He just kept pulling them and pulling them! We began to think maybe there was no carp left in the pond…

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Well, our poopyfaces were short lived because eventually the man left and released the fish. FINALLY my bobber started moving and low and behold I had a bite! I set the hook, fought like hell when finally the HOG surfaced!

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Literally the tiniest bass I have ever seen in my life. Yup, that’s a large mouth. I am not even sure there are supposed to be bass here (it wasn’t advertised). Sure was a cute one though! We then sat for hours without action until somehow Dan caught the attention of the owner. Dan has this thing where for some reason older men always want to take him under their wings. I say it’s because he looks like a “애기” (pronounced aegi, means baby) so they think he needs guidance, but he claims its because he always speaks to them very respectfully as if they are wise and in his words “I am very old school.” The man really went out of his way to sit down with us and explain issues with our technique. For one, our weight was too heavy and as he put it, it would work only if we were trying to knock the fish unconscious to catch it (haha). Of course, Dan did all the talking/listening and I just sort of sat there, and waited for him to translate…when he felt like it…

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Note I’ve fallen into a lot of the Korean trends… denim on denim… Adidas shoes… we have a matching pair of course.

Anyways, so he shaves down our weights and instructs us to pull when the bobber goes up as opposed to down because common carp, which were the dominant fish in the pond, because of the particular way the carp sucks up the bait. He spent a good hour or more helping us out, it was much appreciated. He also told us all about owning a fishing park and the struggles that come with it. So after much help and past nightfall…FINALLY…

IMG_20160926_160449Dan pulls up this single small common carp. We were completely stoked and…Well, it was better than nothing of course and the instruction we got from the owner was absolutely priceless and worthwhile. That was it for the night, so we retired to our little bungalow that we rented. These ones were further away from the docks, and each had a little picnic table in front of it, TV and mats inside. There was definitely a party going on at the place next to us. Funny thing was I had noticed a random carton of cigarettes on the picnic table in front of our door, but later on when we went to go to bed it was gone. In it’s place was a wrapped up choco pie like this:

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Not sure what that was about but I thought it was sorta goofy! Overall, I really enjoyed this place even though we weren’t bringing in fish by the bucketful like some folks. The atmosphere was really nice and I would love to go back to try out the saltwater area someday. We didn’t catch our Sturgeon, but we had a great time!

Gipiul Fishing

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Once again, we found ourselves in Pocheon at Gipiul Fishing, an oxbow lake on a tributary of the Gayung River. Dan went out ahead of me since he had the day off from work, and managed to have a fish steal one of our poles, causing a whole scene and an elderly man to have to boat around and locate the pole haha. But in the meantime, he caught a pretty big catfish. Once I got there I was surprised to see that the bungalow we had was not only floating, but didn’t have any road to get to it. So a worker took us out on a boat to get to it, which was pretty cool.

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This place was very nice. Much less spiders that previous places, and there was a little broom you could use to sweep off the area. Also, believe it or not there was a little bed inside! As well as a TV, and air conditioning. Talk about fishing in luxury. As usual, we fished off the front porch area with overhead coverage. Within the first hour of when I finally got there (around 7p), I made a pretty nice catch.

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Another nice thing was you could order dinner to be delivered via the boat, haha. So we ordered some nice Korean fishes and soju. I made another catch in that same hour of a medium sized korean carp (full suit of scales) and tossed it in with the catfish. Not much luck after that, so we wrapped it up around midnight and went to sleep completely comfortable on the bed. Here’s Dan looking like a goof as we enjoy our meal in our bungalow.

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Come morning, we check on our net and the carp was completely missing! Knowing very little about the behavior of this fish, and knowing that catfish tend to be predatory, we began to assume the two catfish had attacked and eaten the carp in the middle of the night.  Then… I went to go use the toilet, and find one dirty little carp covered in grime laying on the floor. Turns out, the common carp is a bit of a jumper. Luckily, we saved it in time that it was still alive. Unfortunately, we had no further action in the morning and decided to pack up.

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We cleaned the two cat fish and the carp and I was in for a little surprise. Being fairly new to cleaning fish, I had no idea what it would look like if the carp was pregnant and I certainly didn’t expect these bright orange balls. Dan managed to clean the catfish via a knock-out-hand-in-throat method… interesting experience, to say the least, but we were very pleased with our bounty.

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Chilbongsan Pond

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The first fishing hole Dan and I visit is Chilbongsan Pond. We had been looking to take up fishing while living in Korea – I was expecting the good ole fashioned spin-fishing I had learned growing up, and was surprised to realize there is in fact a difference between the American fishing I’m used to and Korean fishing. The style is primitive– no reel. This location has overhead coverage in most locations, which is nice in the hot Korean summer. You enter by going down a steep hill, and parking in the lot. There’s a small tackle shop right in front of the pond area to stop in for payment and equipment rental if you need it (snacks and soju are also available for purchase along with all the tackle shop essentials). The people are very friendly and helpful from my experience.

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This location is a small privately owned pond in Yangju. It costs about 20,000 KRW to fish for the day. The owners keep the pond supplied with medium sized Amur Catfish (Maegi or  메기 in Korean). It’s a great place for beginners because they rent out all the equipment (poles, hooks, stands, bait, nets, everything) so you can get used to the style.

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The first day, we rented out all the equipment and successfully caught one catfish the whole night, leaving around 11pm. Eventually, we got our own equipment, weighed out a stone and hook assembly and had much better luck – 5 catfish in a night– but this time we took advantage of the cute little bungalows they rent out here. They’re tiny rooms equipped with fans, a small T.V., and blankets/pillows to sleep on. They’re right in front of the pond and you can truly fish in your front yard.  Really convenient and cozy. They also have a screen door, so if it gets too buggy (bring spray), you can still see your lines easily from the screen. You can see the bungalows on the left of the picture below.

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They have a fairly clean bathroom (by public Korean standards, especially) across a small bridge and up a hill a bit. Not too far at all, but bring your own TP! But the coolest part about this, especially for new fishers, is that using the catfish you catch yourself, the owners will cook them for you and make a delicious Maetung Spicy Catfish soup, complete with side dishes. Once you turn in your catches, they’ll announce on a loudspeaker your food is ready and you go collect it from the cafe on a tray with utensils and water, and a small ‘jet-boil’ type portable stove with the soup in a big pot. Best part of this little fishing hole, by far. They will also bag the fish if you wish to take them back with you.

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Overall, a really fun place to learn how to fish in Korea. It was conducive to beginners, close to Camp Casey (15 minutes), and the fish bite like hell! If you want to ease into fishing in country, I would highly recommend this pond in Yangju. Directions on how to get there are on their website, or you can check out the nifty map in my directory. 🙂

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