Hantan/Imjin River Junction

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At this point, Dan had ventured off on his own to trying a whole new type of carp fishing inspired by British anglers. He ditched the traditional cane poles for long, heavy-duty rods similar to those used in American cat fishing. The three rods were baited with boilles, and medium weights, tossed out into the river and subsequently placed into a rod holder. On each rod, Dan placed a little bell that rings when a fish snags the line — exactly like American cat fishing! He had a lot of success with this method! Here are a few highlights:

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Needless to say this technique was a lot more successful. When the fish sucks the bait into his mouth, the small hooks get set once he begins to swim away. The bail is set to a very low level of drag, so when the carp gets on there, the line whizzes, and you have to jump and set the drag in order to reel the fish in.

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A major benefit to fishing in the river as opposed to a private lake/pond is that you can go all day and night and it’s 100% free, as long as you have the right equipment. A downside is that it can be less of a guaranteed catch every time, since it can depend on things like the lunar cycle, tides, currant and weather a lot more than a small privately stocked pond. Also you will lose countless rigs to debris. But something is pretty satisfying about hauling out some fairly large wild fish.

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This picture made me laugh because butterfingers Dan very obviously dropped the fish in the sand and didn’t bother to clean him off before taking the selfie haha. Poor guy! The fish, I mean!

For the most part, we did catch-and-release from the river. Cool experience to use a new technique.

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